bath - bathe

bath - bathe
'bath'
In British English, a bath is a long rectangular container which you fill with water and sit in while you wash your body.

The bathroom had two basins, a huge bath and more towels than I had ever seen.

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In American English, a container like this is called a bathtub or a tub.

I spent hours in the warmth of the bathtub.

I lowered myself deeper into the tub.

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If you bath someone, you wash them in a bath.

She will show you how to bath the baby.

We bathed and dried Sandy together.

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You do not say that people bath themselves. British speakers say that someone has a bath.

I'm going to have a bath.

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'bathe'
American speakers say that someone takes a bath or, more formally, that they bathe .

I took a bath, my second that day.

After golf I would return to my apartment to bathe and change.

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Bathe is not used with this meaning in British English. In British English, when someone bathes, they swim or play in a lake or river or in the sea.

It is dangerous to bathe in the sea here.

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This use of bathe is now rather old-fashioned. In modern English, you usually say that someone goes swimming or goes for a swim. American speakers sometimes say that someone takes a swim.

She's going for a swim.

I went down to the ocean and took a swim.

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In both British and American English, if you bathe a cut or wound, you wash it.

He bathed the cuts on her feet.

She had watched her mother bathe his face and bandage his hands.

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Note that `bath' and `bathe' both have the present participle bathing and the past tense and past participle bathed.
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Useful english dictionary. 2012.

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Look at other dictionaries:

  • bathe — bath, bathe (verbs). In BrE to bath is to have a bath (i.e. wash oneself immersed in a domestic bath), and to bathe is to go into the sea or a river to swim (although usage in this meaning is now dated) or (transitively) to wipe or soothe a wound …   Modern English usage

  • bathe — bāth vb, bathed; bath·ing vt 1) to wash in a liquid (as water) 2) to apply water or a liquid medicament to <bathe the eye with warm water> vi to take a bath bathe n Brit the act or action of bathing: BATH …   Medical dictionary

  • bath — bath, bathe (verbs). In BrE to bath is to have a bath (i.e. wash oneself immersed in a domestic bath), and to bathe is to go into the sea or a river to swim (although usage in this meaning is now dated) or (transitively) to wipe or soothe a wound …   Modern English usage

  • bathe — [bāth] vt. bathed, bathing [ME bathen < OE bathian < bæth, BATH1] 1. to put into a liquid; immerse 2. to give a bath to; wash 3. to wet or moisten [sweat bathed his brow] 4 …   English World dictionary

  • bath — bath, bathe ou bathouse adj. Beau : Une bathe gonzesse. / Bon : Merci, t es bath. / Agréable : Le cinoche, c est bath. / Bath au pieu, adroit en amour. □ n.m. Vrai, authentique : C est pas du toc, c est du bath …   Dictionnaire du Français argotique et populaire

  • bath — 1 noun plural baths (C) 1 BrE a large long container that you fill with water and sit in to wash yourself; bathtub especially AmE: run a bath (=make water flow into a bath) 2 an act of washing your body in a bath: After a week of camping, I… …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • bath — bɑːθ v. take a bath, bathe, wash oneself in a bath n. large container which holds water for bathing; washing; bathroom …   English contemporary dictionary

  • Bathe — (b[=a][th]), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Bathed} (b[=a][th]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Bathing}.] [OE. ba[eth]ien, AS. ba[eth]ian, fr. b[ae][eth] bath. See 1st {Bath}, and cf. {Bay} to bathe.] 1. To wash by immersion, as in a bath; to subject to a bath. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • bath´er — bathe «bayth», verb, bathed, bath|ing, noun. –v.i. 1. to take a bath: »Some boys don t like to bathe regularly. 2. Especially British. to go swimming; go into a river, lake, or ocean, for pleasure or to get cool …   Useful english dictionary

  • Bathe — Bathe, v. i. 1. To bathe one s self; to take a bath or baths. They bathe in summer. Waller. [1913 Webster] 2. To immerse or cover one s self, as in a bath. To bathe in fiery floods. Shak. Bathe in the dimples of her cheek. Lloyd. [1913 Webster] 3 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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